Frontside Shuvit

Category

Shuvits

Learn first

Endovers

Use

Mellow kicktails

Difficulty

1/10

Speed

Slow

Avoid

Long boards

Frontside Shuvit

Category

Shuvits

Learn first

Endovers

Use

Mellow kicktails

Difficulty

1/10

Speed

Slow

Avoid

Long boards

Frontside Shuvit

Category

Shuvits

Learn first

Endovers

Use

Mellow kicktails

Difficulty

1/10

Speed

Slow

Avoid

Long boards

Just like the 180 shuvit, this frontside shuvit is going to spin off the nose. The reason for this is simple: by using the front wheels as the pivot point, you can repurpose your rolling momentum instead of fighting it.

It’s important that you’ve already learned how to do Endovers at this point; a frontside shuvit is basically nothing more than an endover where your body doesn’t travel with it. That might sound odd now, but hopefully you’ll understand how this works by the time this tricktip is over.

Frontside Shuvit Sequence 01

Your starting position, as you might expect from the intro, is exactly the same as for Endovers; you want your feet perpendicular to the board with each one positioned just after the truck bolts.

Frontside Shuvit Sequence 02

As I roll into this, I stay relaxed, but have the benefit of looking down with a clear view of the board. Unlike most shuvits, you can see frontside shuvits throughout the whole spin.

Frontside Shuvit Sequence 03

The trick begins much like an endover – I bring my front shoulder back, switch my weight slightly to the front foot, and start pushing my rear hip forwards. The difference is that I don’t need to commit too much movement to the front shoulder – I don’t want my upper body to move at all.

Frontside Shuvit Sequence 04

It’s tough to tell from this angle but my front foot isn’t really scooping backwards – my rear hip is really driving the whole rotation. If I get into the habit of doing too much with my front foot, the board will flip when I start doing bigger rotations.

Frontside Shuvit Sequence 05

At this point I’ve pushed the board through 90º, so I can let go of it. It’s a tiny jump upwards (and slightly towards the nose) – you really don’t need much height for the board to get through the 180º spin.

Frontside Shuvit Sequence 05 CLOSE

This is the same frame as the last, but I’ve zoomed in close to highlight something – the board doesn’t leave the floor. At this point, the frontside shuvit is literally spinning on the front wheels, just like an endover would.

Frontside Shuvit Sequence 06

This is the peak of the jump. I’ve already bought my back foot back in line with where the board is going to land, but I’ve only been off the griptape for a split second. This whole move happens very quickly.

Frontside Shuvit Sequence 07

Here’s the “catch”. Get into the habit of catching this back foot first if you can – it’ll help you wind round the last part of the rotation if you need it later (and it’s the only way you’ll ever land a frontside gazelle).

Frontside Shuvit Sequence 08

And now I can roll away. Comparing this frame with the third, you can see I’ve moved a whole board length forwards, but nothing else has really changed in my upper body at all. It should be a very casual, laid-back trick.


Additional Notes

Unlike the regular 180º shuvit, this should feel fairly natural with a kicknose, and therefore most modern skaters – particularly those who’ve already spent time standing sideways for ollie tricks – should find this fairly natural. However, don’t get into the habit of thinking of it as a “nollie trick”; remember that you’re not trying to pop, and the board shouldn’t lose contact with the floor at all for a 180º frontside shuvit. That’s part of the reason you want to start with your feet so far apart – it’ll limit the amount the tail can lift off the floor. This is something which will get even more important if you start building up to 360º, 540º or even 720º shuvits in this direction!

There’s not much I can really recommend, setup-wise, for this trick. You can do a frontside shuvit with this technique on basically any board – even 46″ dancers – but in order for it to flow properly in footwork, you really want a wheelbase which feels comfortable between your feet. Unless you have stupidly long legs, having to stretch past a 14″ wheelbase for these feels horrible, and it just won’t look as smooth or natural in a sequence.

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