Backside 360 Shuvit

Category

Shuvits

Learn first

180 shuvits

Use

Shorter boards

Difficulty

3/10

Speed

Medium

Avoid

Steep noses

Backside 360 Shuvit

Category

Shuvits

Learn first

180 shuvits

Use

Shorter boards

Difficulty

3/10

Speed

Medium

Avoid

Steep noses

Backside 360 Shuvit

Category

Shuvits

Learn first

180 shuvits

Use

Shorter boards

Difficulty

3/10

Speed

Medium

Avoid

Steep noses

As you might expect, the backside 360 shuvit is like a 180 shuvit, only you kick it a bit harder.

As such, if you learned the backside shuvit correctly – i.e. with the foot placement we showed you – there should only be some small adjustments to make at this point. Hopefully.

And yes, like most shuvits on this site, this is going to spin off the nose. The reason for this is simple: by using the front wheels as the pivot point, you can repurpose your rolling momentum instead of fighting it. Just don’t pop – this isn’t a nollie!

Backside-360-Shuvit-Sequence-01

While you might have been able to do the 180 shuvit with a more casual stance, the 360 really demands the front foot points straight forward, as shown here. My back foot is across the tail, toes right on the toeside edge.

Backside-360-Shuvit-Sequence-02

I roll into this trick with moderate speed. I’m going to take my rolling speed and transform it into rotational energy, so going too slowly will make this more difficult than it needs to be. Note my shoulder position, too – I’m facing the direction of travel throughout.

Backside-360-Shuvit-Sequence-03

To start the trick, I press down on my toes, lifting the back wheels slightly. This is a gentle move – you’re not trying to stomp down to get the nose to pop off the ground. At the same time, I start flicking my heel outwards, and push the tail around behind me with the back foot.

Backside-360-Shuvit-Sequence-04

As I leave the board, you can see why the front foot started straight – I’ve spun the foot 90º to throw the board into a spin, and this has kept the centre of rotation directly under me. I’m also jumping forwards slightly; if I don’t, I won’t be able to land on the board as it completes the 360 shuvit.

Backside-360-Shuvit-Sequence-05

With the board spinning like a fan blade beneath me, I hover above it for a split second, waiting for it to finish the rotation. Notice that I don’t actually have to jump too high for this one – save the big leap for the 540 shuvit.

Backside-360-Shuvit-Sequence-06

The board is spinning into the last 90º of the shuvit here, so I start getting ready to catch it. I want to connect with the back foot first in much the same way as I did with the frontside 360 shuvit. That’ll allow me to wind it round slightly if I’ve caught it short.

Backside-360-Shuvit-Sequence-07

I catch my board over the back bolts, but my front foot still isn’t on it. At this point I can slide round the last bit if need be. Notice I’m also leaning forwards slightly – it’s very easy to shoot out and fall over backwards if you’re not.

Backside-360-Shuvit-Sequence-08

It looks like I couldn’t quite force the board through the last 25º, so I have to put the front foot down anyway and compensate with a bit of a carve. I’m blaming the rough floor for this one.

Backside-360-Shuvit-Sequence-09

This wasn’t a perfect catch, but on the video it looks like a fairly smooth landing. That’s thanks to my trucks, which I run very slightly looser than most freestylers. This is pretty important for rolling tricks – especially if you like going fast.

Additional Notes

Backside shuvits have existed long before kicktails, and that foot position may feel pretty unusual if you’re using a steep nosed street board. Don’t compromise with a more sideways position – even if it feels more “natural” to begin with, it’ll lead to all sorts of problems – including difficulty getting the full rotation and keeping the board under you. Eventually you’ll get use to the foot position, but if you still find it uncomfortable, consider moving to a freestyle deck. Not only will the nose be a bit flatter, making these more natural, but it’ll make a huge difference to all of your freestyle tricks in the long run.

Like with the frontside 360 shuvit, don’t get into the habit of thinking of this as a “nollie trick”; remember that you’re not trying to pop, and the board shouldn’t really lose contact with the floor for too long on a 360 shuvit. That’s part of the reason you want to start with your feet so far apart – it’ll limit the amount the tail can lift off the floor. This is something which will get even more important if you start building up to larger shuvits or gazelles in this direction!

Needless to say, while the 180 shuvit could be done on more or less any board, by the time you get to 360º of rotation, excessively long boards become quite difficult to spin. A steep nose will also make this feel heavier and more awkward than it needs to be. You really want a wheelbase which feels comfortable between your feet; unless you have stupidly long legs, having to stretch past a 14″ wheelbase for these feels horrible, and it just won’t look as smooth or natural.

Need more help?

COMMENTS (1)

  • David Thornton

    20th April 2019 , 12:35 AM / reply

    Excellent! Thank you for these!

Keep the tips coming

Buy us a coffee!Buy us a coffee! Buy us a coffee! Buy us a coffee!

Subscribe to the Tips

Enter your email below to be notified whenever a new tricktip goes live:

Get the tips via RSS

RSS Feed RSS - Posts