Reintges Flip

Category

Rail Tricks

Learn first

Heelside Rail

Use

Freestyle wheels

Difficulty

3/10

Speed

Stationary

Avoid

Loose trucks

Reintges Flip

Category

Rail Tricks

Learn first

Heelside Rail

Use

Freestyle wheels

Difficulty

3/10

Speed

Stationary

Avoid

Loose trucks

Reintges Flip

Category

Rail Tricks

Learn first

Heelside Rail

Use

Freestyle wheels

Difficulty

3/10

Speed

Stationary

Avoid

Loose trucks

The Reintges flip is usually known for having the most mispronounced name in freestyle, but that does it a disservice; it’s an incredibly fun trick and probably one of the most satisfying things to do from heelside rail. The goal is to get the board to travel vertically end-over-end from one end of the board, with an additional half flip making sure the board lands on the wheels. Get warmed up, because you’ll need to jump fairly high for this one.

You don’t need to know how to do a “regular” railflip before you learn Reintges flips, but it’d probably help.

Reintges Flip Sequence 01

This starting position photo isn’t overly helpful as the board is fairly obscured. Put the ball of the back foot on the wheel, and the heel on the rail. Both feet need to be together, and pointing at a 45º angle between the truck and nose.

Reintges Flip Sequence 02

Here’s what that looks like from the side. Keep your weight on the back foot and this should be a fairly solid position.

Reintges Flip Sequence 03

When I prepare for the trick, I have to bend down while keeping my weight on the wheel. Don’t push forwards too soon or you’ll lose your balance.

Reintges Flip Sequence 04

As you launch upwards, push down on your toes with both feet, and rock the board into the diagonal between the truck and nose. It should start tipping forwards quite easily. At the same time, you want to be jumping slightly forwards to where the board will land.

Reintges Flip Sequence 05

This frame is key – you can see my back foot lifts up a fraction earlier than my front foot, which flicks slightly further forwards, pushing the nose into the flip. Without that motion, the board won’t complete the full rotation.

Reintges Flip Sequence 06

At this point, the board is rising up behind me. I can’t see it at all now, so all I can do is get out of the way and hope. Once you’ve landed a few Reintges flips, you’ll know by the way the takeoff felt whether the trick is going okay behind you.

Reintges Flip Sequence 07

Here’s the next key part of the trick. Some people try splitting their legs to let the board drift between them, but I always feel that makes the flip unpredictable. I just jump as high as I can, sucking my knees up towards my chest.

Reintges Flip Sequence 08

At this point the board will magically appear beneath you if everything’s worked out okay. You might not be able to see it, but extend your legs and catch it anyway, or the board will keep flipping.

Reintges Flip Sequence 09

You want to aim for the truck bolts, but being as you won’t really see them, the spacing of your feet needs to be based on familiarity with the board. This is where having the right size deck will really come in useful.

Reintges Flip Sequence 10

This is always a great moment. There’s something very satisfying about pushing one of these back to the ground – it never gets old.

Reintges Flip Sequence 11

I could have ended this sequence on the last photo, but I wanted to illustrate one thing – you tend to come down fairly hard on these. Expect to have to soak up some shock by bending down slightly on the landing.



Additional Notes

Like all rail tricks, it’s important that the axle of your trucks is shorter than the width of your deck, and ideally, you want to be using freestyle wheels to protect the axle nuts (and the soles of your feet). However, because you’re balancing precariously at one end of the board, you should also make sure your trucks aren’t too loose. Wobby trucks will make it very hard to set up for this trick properly.

As usual, I’m doing this trick on my pro model from Moonshine Skateboards, but it should work on pretty much any board. If the nose or tail you’re flipping from is more square, it might feel a bit “clunky”, but the basic mechanics are the same.

Throughout this guide, I’ve assumed that you’ve been doing this off the “nose”, with the back foot being used to stabilise yourself and the front foot generating the flip. If you find it more comfortable at the other end of the board, just reverse the instructions on this page. It doesn’t really matter which way you do it – it’s still a Reintges flip.

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